Balco steroids case

[ Editor's Note: Chryste Gaines, MBA, Olympic gold and bronze medal sprinter and former teammate of Marion Jones in the 2000 Sydney Olympic Games, stated the following in a Dec. 22, 2008 email to in response to the IOC ruling:

"We are being unfairly punished. If the drug testing agencies cannot determine if an athlete is taking performance enhancing drugs how are the teammates supposed to know?... It negates all the family functions, church functions, and social events we missed in the name of winning an Olympic medal." ]

Owens was a supremely talented receiver, but he also was a supremely selfish player who submarined multiple franchises during his playing career. Owens forced his way out of San Francisco only to have a two-year stint in Philadelphia that ended with him doing sit-ups in a driveway before being suspended by the team. Owens resurfaced in Dallas, and that ended badly, too. After stints in Buffalo and Cincinnati, Owens’ 15-year career ended with Hall of Fame numbers. But he is having to wait longer because of all that damage.

Two San Francisco Chronicle reporters will avoid jail time after a criminal defense lawyer agreed to plead guilty to leaking them secret grand jury documents from the BALCO steroids investigation.

Attorney Troy Ellerman said in court papers filed Wednesday that he allowed reporters Lance Williams and Mark Fainaru-Wada to view transcripts of the grand jury testimony of baseball stars Barry Bonds, Jason Giambi, Gary Sheffield and sprinter Tim Montgomery, according to court documents.

The Chronicle published stories in 2004 that reported Giambi and Montgomery admitted taking steroids while Bonds and Sheffield testified that they didn’t knowingly take performance enhancing drugs.

A federal judge ordered the reporters jailed after they refused to divulge the source of the story. They have remained free pending an appeal to the . 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. Ellerman’s plea agreement stated that the federal prosecutors will no longer try to put the reporters in prison.

The deal calls for Ellerman to spend two years in prison and pay a $250,000 fine; the terms are subject to approval by a judge. No date has been set for the plea hearing.

Ellerman, who serves as commissioner of the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association, represented Victor Conte, founder of the Bay Area Laboratory Co-operative, the Burlingame supplements lab at the center of the federal steroid probe. He later represented vice president James Valente.

Chronicle managing editor Robert Rosenthal declined to comment and referred calls to the newspaper’s lawyers.

Ellerman’s attorney, Scott Tedmon, could not immediately be reached for comment.

Conte and Valente were among five men who pleaded guilty in an earlier phase of the investigation, along with chemist Patrick Arnold, Bonds’ personal trainer Greg Anderson, and track coach Remi Korchemny.

Bonds has never been charged but a cloud of suspicion continues to plague the San Francisco Giants slugger as he chases baseball’s career home run record. He told the grand jury he thought Anderson had given him flaxseed oil and arthritic balm, rather than the BALCO steroids known as “The Clear” and “The Cream.” A federal grand jury is investigating Bonds for possible perjury and obstruction of justice charges.


What is it? An anabolic steroid (a steroid that acts as the hormone testosterone) that occurs in small amounts in the human body.
Medical Use: Used to treat osteoporosis in postmenopausal women, to aid in the growth of blood cells in bone marrow, and to help tissue and muscle growth in people suffering from degenerative diseases like AIDS.
Athletic Use: To grow muscle mass and aid in physical recovery from workouts.
Possible Negative Side Effects: Cardiovascular damage, sexual dysfunction, liver damage, acne, sterility, baldness, enlarged prostate.
Is it legal? Available only by prescription.

Technically speaking, BALCO is extinct, but Victor Conte is a free man and still running a business called "Scientific Nutrition for Advanced Conditioning" or "SNAC." After serving a four-month prison sentence prior to pleading guilty in 2005, he now sells various supplements and vitamins. Patrick Arnold and Greg Anderson each served a three-month jail sentence after pleading guilty with Anderson serving an additional three-month house arrest sentence. Recently Anderson was incarcerated again after being found in contempt of court for refusing to testify about Barry Bonds and Gary Sheffield’s use of banned steroids. [14] BALCO is not completely dead however; on the SNAC website, Conte has BALCO apparel for sale. [15]

Balco steroids case

balco steroids case


What is it? An anabolic steroid (a steroid that acts as the hormone testosterone) that occurs in small amounts in the human body.
Medical Use: Used to treat osteoporosis in postmenopausal women, to aid in the growth of blood cells in bone marrow, and to help tissue and muscle growth in people suffering from degenerative diseases like AIDS.
Athletic Use: To grow muscle mass and aid in physical recovery from workouts.
Possible Negative Side Effects: Cardiovascular damage, sexual dysfunction, liver damage, acne, sterility, baldness, enlarged prostate.
Is it legal? Available only by prescription.

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