Is methylphenidate a steroid

Serious side effects such as seizures (this usually happens in children with a history of seizures), painful and prolonged erections (priapism), slowing of growth (weight and height), persistent loss of skin color (chemical leukoderma) and eyesight changes or blurred vision have been reported with the Daytrana patch. Because of the potential for lasting damage, seek medical help immediately if you or your child develops priapism. Your child should have their height, weight, and blood work checked while using the Daytrana patch and the doctor may stop treatment if a problem is found during these check-ups. Allergic skin rash may occur. Stop using the Daytrana patch and see the doctor right away if swelling, bumps, or blisters happen at or around the site where the patch is applied. If the patch is worn longer than 9 hours in a day, or if more than 1 patch is worn at a time, too much medicine has been applied. Avoid exposing the Daytrana patch to direct external heat sources such as hair dryers, heating pads, electric blankets, heated water beds, or other heat sources while wearing the patch. Heating the patch could cause too much medicine to pass into your child's body and cause serious side effects.

“Depression and anxiety sort of run in my family but I always said I didn't have that affliction. Eventually my grandmother told me she could tell from some of the things I said that I did have some degree of depression. I wasn't convinced. Then I started taking Flavay® and Flavay Plus® and I felt a new positive psychological outlook. Sometimes I would take 2 capsules of each and sometimes 4 capsules of each since I had read online that some people like taking 4 of each better. When I ran out of Flavay® and Flavay Plus® I didn't reorder because I was feeling so good.

The manufacturers warn that methylphenidate should not be used for severe depression of either exogenous or endogenous origin.

Some studies have shown methylphenidate to be an effective adjuvant medication when used along with other standard antidepressant drug therapy (SSRIs or TCAs) for depression. However, no specific coadministered antidepressant medication or dose of methylphenidate has been generally accepted as optimum therapy. Therefore, no specific therapy or dose of methylphenidate can be recommended at this time for use in patients with depression.

Nervousness and insomnia are the most common adverse reactions but are usually controlled by reducing dosage and omitting the drug in the afternoon or evening. Other reactions include hypersensitivity (including skin rash, urticaria , fever, arthralgia , exfoliative dermatitis , erythema multiforme with histopathological findings of necrotizing vasculitis , and thrombocytopenic purpura ); anorexia ; nausea; dizziness; palpitations ; headache; dyskinesia ; drowsiness; blood pressure and pulse changes, both up and down; tachycardia ; angina ; cardiac arrhythmia ; abdominal pain; weight loss during prolonged therapy; libido changes. There have been rare reports of Tourette's syndrome. Toxic psychosis has been reported. Although a definite causal relationship has not been established, the following have been reported in patients taking this drug: serotonin syndrome in combination with serotonergic drugs, rhabdomyolysis , instances of abnormal liver function, ranging from transaminase elevation to severe hepatic injury; isolated cases of cerebral arteritis and/or occlusion ; leukopenia and/or anemia ; transient depressed mood; aggressive behavior; a few instances of scalp hair loss. Very rare reports of neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) have been received, and, in most of these, patients were concurrently receiving therapies associated with NMS. In a single report, a 10-year-old boy who had been taking methylphenidate for approximately 18 months experienced an NMS-like event within 45 minutes of ingesting his first dose of venlafaxine. It is uncertain whether this case represented a drug-drug interaction, a response to either drug alone, or some other cause.

In studies conducted in rats and rabbits, methylphenidate was administered orally at doses of up to 75 and 200 mg/kg/day, respectively, during the period of organogenesis. Teratogenic effects (increased incidence of fetal spina bifida) were observed in rabbits at the highest dose, which is approximately 40 times the maximum recommended human dose (MRHD) on a mg/m² basis. The no effect level for embryo-fetal development in rabbits was 60 mg/kg/day (11 times the MRHD on a mg/m² basis). There was no evidence of specific teratogenic activity in rats, although increased incidences of fetal skeletal variations were seen at the highest dose level (7 times the MRHD on a mg/m² basis), which was also maternally toxic. The no effect level for embryo-fetal development in rats was 25 mg/kg/day (2 times the MRHD on a mg/m² basis).

Is methylphenidate a steroid

is methylphenidate a steroid

Nervousness and insomnia are the most common adverse reactions but are usually controlled by reducing dosage and omitting the drug in the afternoon or evening. Other reactions include hypersensitivity (including skin rash, urticaria , fever, arthralgia , exfoliative dermatitis , erythema multiforme with histopathological findings of necrotizing vasculitis , and thrombocytopenic purpura ); anorexia ; nausea; dizziness; palpitations ; headache; dyskinesia ; drowsiness; blood pressure and pulse changes, both up and down; tachycardia ; angina ; cardiac arrhythmia ; abdominal pain; weight loss during prolonged therapy; libido changes. There have been rare reports of Tourette's syndrome. Toxic psychosis has been reported. Although a definite causal relationship has not been established, the following have been reported in patients taking this drug: serotonin syndrome in combination with serotonergic drugs, rhabdomyolysis , instances of abnormal liver function, ranging from transaminase elevation to severe hepatic injury; isolated cases of cerebral arteritis and/or occlusion ; leukopenia and/or anemia ; transient depressed mood; aggressive behavior; a few instances of scalp hair loss. Very rare reports of neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) have been received, and, in most of these, patients were concurrently receiving therapies associated with NMS. In a single report, a 10-year-old boy who had been taking methylphenidate for approximately 18 months experienced an NMS-like event within 45 minutes of ingesting his first dose of venlafaxine. It is uncertain whether this case represented a drug-drug interaction, a response to either drug alone, or some other cause.

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